What makes Cognac popular

Cognac is expensive, rare and the prices are growing. Still, as Christmas is almost knocking at the doors, you must be gearing up for several exciting things. So, what will be you favorite liquor this Christmas? Haven’t you decided yet? Then it’s high time for you to decide on your favorite liquor. If you are a liquor lover, you must have heard about Cognac brandy. This is a liquid spirit refined exclusively from a wine that is produced in the Cognac region of France. It is one of the most popular brandies that are produced in the wine-growing area of coastal South Western France. Normal brandy can be produced anywhere across the globe but when it comes to this particular liquor France is the only place.

In order to produce this brandy, the production methods require a special legal permission. It should be made from some particular grapes of that coastal region of Cognac. Among the most popular ones, Ugnic Blance is the most widely used grapes required to prepare the spirit. Also known as Saint-Emilion in local terms, this grape must be at least distilled twice in copper ‘vessel stills’ and aged minimum two years in French oak barrels. Usually such liquors are aged significantly longer than the minimum legal prerequisite. When ripened in barrel, like other spirits like wine and whisky, this brandy also matures in the same way.

The regions that are authorized to produce Cognac brandy is segregated into six zones. This includes the five crus largely covering a huge part of Charente department, the department of Charente-Maritime, and a few areas in the Dordonge and Deux-Sevres. The six includes Petite Champagne, Fins Bois, Grande Champagne, Bois Ordinaire, Borderies and Bon Bois. Make sure you do not confuse with the wine region of Champagne that is quite popular in the north-eastern part of France.

We all know that wine is quite acidic and dry and virtually undrinkable. However, it is considered to be excellent for aging and distillation. Distillation, fermentation, aging and blending is very important when it comes to making of perfect alcohol. If you are looking for the world’s best brandy in this Christmas, then you have to drink Cognac at least once. There are different types of such brandy bottles available in market. Each of them comes with diverse combination of letters like C, O, S, V, F, E, P and X. These letters speaks about the distillation and bottling process. Each of the characters holds different meanings like V- very, E- especial, O- old, F – fine, S – superior, X – extra and P – pale.
Among the wide varieties of brandy made in that particular wine region of France, Remy Martin needs a special mention. This has been one of the most demanding liquor brand names since ages. Centuries of studies and finest productions have resulted in making unparalleled taste and flavor of the brandy.

Whoever had it once, could never restrict him/her from having again. As French brandy is quite expensive, what you can do is browse through the online stores and pick up the one of your choice.

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4 Comments Add Yours ↓

  1. Stephen #
    1

    As most brandies are distilled from grapes, the regions of the world producing excellent brandies have roughly paralleled those areas producing grapes for viniculture. At the end of the 19th century, the western European market—and by extension their overseas empires—was dominated by French and Spanish brandies, and eastern Europe was dominated by brandies from the Black Sea region, including Bulgaria, the Crimea, and Georgia. In 1880, David Saradjishvili founded his Cognac Factory in Tbilisi, Georgia (then part of the Russian Empire) which was a crossroads for Turkish, Central Asian, and Persian trade routes. Armenian and Georgian brandies (always called cognacs in the era) were considered some of the best in the world, often beating their French competitors at the International Expositions in Paris and Brussels in the early 1900s. The storehouses of the Romanov Court in St. Petersburg were regarded as the largest collections of cognacs and wines in the world—much of it from the Transcaucasus region of Georgia. During the October Revolution of 1917, upon the storming of the Winter Palace, the Bolshevik Revolution actually paused for a week or so as the rioters gorged on the substantial stores of cognac and wines. The Russian market was always a huge brandy-consuming region, and while much of it was home-grown, much was imported. The patterns of bottles follow that of western European norm. Throughout the Soviet era, the production of brandy remained a source of pride for the communist regime, and they continued to produce some excellent varieties—most famously the Jubilee Brandies of 1967, 1977, and 1987. Remaining bottles of these productions are highly sought after, not simply for their quality, but for their historical significance.

  2. idebenone #
    2

    As most brandies are distilled from grapes, the regions of the world producing excellent brandies have roughly paralleled those areas producing grapes for viniculture. At the end of the 19th century, the western European market—and by extension their overseas empires—was dominated by French and Spanish brandies, and eastern Europe was dominated by brandies from the Black Sea region, including Bulgaria, the Crimea, and Georgia. In 1880, David Saradjishvili founded his Cognac Factory in Tbilisi, Georgia (then part of the Russian Empire) which was a crossroads for Turkish, Central Asian, and Persian trade routes. Armenian and Georgian brandies (always called cognacs in the era) were considered some of the best in the world, often beating their French competitors at the International Expositions in Paris and Brussels in the early 1900s. The storehouses of the Romanov Court in St. Petersburg were regarded as the largest collections of cognacs and wines in the world—much of it from the Transcaucasus region of Georgia. During the October Revolution of 1917, upon the storming of the Winter Palace, the Bolshevik Revolution actually paused for a week or so as the rioters gorged on the substantial stores of cognac and wines. The Russian market was always a huge brandy-consuming region, and while much of it was home-grown, much was imported. The patterns of bottles follow that of western European norm. Throughout the Soviet era, the production of brandy remained a source of pride for the communist regime, and they continued to produce some excellent varieties—most famously the Jubilee Brandies of 1967, 1977, and 1987. Remaining bottles of these productions are highly sought after, not simply for their quality, but for their historical significance.

  3. 3

    Climate Change The possible impact of global warming on the Cognac industry cannot be ignored. One study of the world’s top 27 wine regions’ temperatures and wine quality over the past 50 years reveals that rising temperatures have already impacted vintage quality. As for the next 50 years, climate modeling for these same regions predicts a 2°C temperature rise. Gregory Jones, the scientist at Southern Oregon University who performed the study, claims that the warmer climate can have two possible consequences: it can make some cooler areas more conducive to wine growing, and it can make the currently warmer areas less favorable for vineyards. For instance, these warmer regions could experience problems in terms of overripe fruit, added water stress, and increases in diseases and pests.

  4. Anonymous #
    4

    First, the brandy must be produced in the Cognac region—about 75 miles north of the famed winemaking area of Bordeaux. Further, Cognac can be made using only a handful of grape varieties, primarily Ugni Blanc. It must be distilled twice in traditional copper pot stills, and aged for at least two years in French oak.



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